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Magnetic Drum Storage for Digital Information Processing Systems, in, Mathematical Tables and other Aids to Computation vol 4 no 29, January 1950 / MTAC 1950. Arnold A. / MTAC vol 4 no 29 January 1950 Cohen, Mathematical Tables, other Aids to Computation vol 4 no 29.

Magnetic Drum Storage for Digital Information Processing Systems, in, Mathematical Tables and other Aids to Computation vol 4 no 29, January 1950 / MTAC 1950.

National Research Council Mathematical Tables and other Aids to Computation, IV, no. 1, January 1950.
Condition: Very Good overall; original light green printed wraps, darkening at margins; chipping along stapled spine, thumbed edges. Staples are tight, pages clean & unmarked. Prev. owner rubberstamp name upper corner inside front cover.
Price: $450.00
Item no. M823
Item Description
A Quarterly Journal edited on behalf of the Committee on Mathematical Tables and Aids to Computation; photo and memoriam Raymond Clark Archibald.

Contents include -- Checking by Differences; Describes the system used at ERA - Engineering Research Associates. Includes a 2 page summary and review of the Harvard Computation Laboratory Annals v 14, Description of a Relay Calculator ('It may be interesting to compare the Harvard Relay Calculator Mark II, with the five relay computers of various sizes already built by the Bell Telephone Laboratories. Of the latter, the so-called 'Stibitz Computers' ... are very nearly the same size as the Mark II, having about 12,000 relays...' (this issue, p. 42)

Also, several paragraphs in the News section, discussing the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation and its debut of BINAC); and details the program for the 1949 Symposium on Large-Scale Digital Calculating Machinery held at Harvard's Computation Laboratory (2 pages) as well as that of the Cambridge University Mathematical Laboratory conference on automatic calculating machines, which included 'a demonstration of the new Cambridge electronic calculating machine, the EDSAC, during which tables of squares and prime numbers were printed...' (p. 51). Also incl an article by George W Reitiesner, a member of the original EDVAC team, entitlted 'An ENIAC Determination of pi and e to more than 2000 Decimal Places' (p 11-15).